Transfer images without cable

Apple computers have a lot of advantages. Especially when you are working with images or movies. But since the SD card has been removed, you must have your card reader and in most cases your USB-A to USB-C cable as well, to get your images into your MacBook. But what if you are on a trip and you have forgotten your card reader and/or your cable, and you would like to transfer your images? In case you are lucky somebody can lend you one if not, there is another possibility to transfer your images to your computer from your E-M1 Mark III or E-M1X.

Preparation

In case you haven’t installed Olympus Workspace on your computer yet, download it from the Olympus website for free. You only need the serial number of your camera. Even, if you are not planning to download your image without a cable, it makes sense to install Olympus Workspace, as it is also used to update the firmware of your cameras.


As soon as you have installed the software, start it and activate WiFi on your E-M1 Mark III or E-M1X. As soon as the WiFi is ready the camera show a QR code and the SSID with password.

Connect the computer WiFi with the SSID of your camera and use password to connect. As soon as your computer is connected you can start.

Procedure

To import your images with Olympus Workspace press the little Icons in the upper right corner and select “….”

A window opens, in which you can select the images you would like to import

You can select the location to which the images should be transferred. Besides, you can rename your images and add IPTC information. After your images are transferred, you either could process them with Olympus Workspace or any other post-processing software.

Summary

In case of an emergency, that you have forgotten your card reader and/or your cable to connect your camera to the computer, the possibility to transfer images with WiFi is very helpful. In this case, it is also no problem that you have to connect your computer to your camera network manually and it is not possible to make that automatically. It is handy that you can rename the images direct when you transfer them, this helps to organise your files.

Utilise Tough TG-6 as GPS Tracker

Only a view system camera, like the Olympus E-M1X for example, do have a built-in GPS. Those cameras can either write the position directly into the EXIF data or record your route. In case you don’t have a system camera with built-in GPS there are several possibilities to record GPS data and write them into EXIF or record your route.
The easiest is for sure the smartphone together with the appropriate App, like OI.track from Olympus. The disadvantage is that a smartphone doesn’t survive the whole day in case you have GPS activated. As I anyhow own a TG-6, which has also a built-in GPS, as a second camera, I’m using it as a GPS tracker.

Advantages

In opposite to the smartphone, the TG-6 can be used over several days without recharging in case you only use GPS recording. Also, you could be sure, that your smartphone is used for other things. As with the smartphone, you can send GPS data to your camera and save them as EXIF data into your image.

Preparations

First, you should connect your TG to your smartphone. As soon as you have done it the time in the TG-6 will be synchronised with the time of your smartphone. When you do the same with your OM-D the time of all three devices are synchronised. This is especially important in case you would like to save the GPS data into your image EXIF data. Base on time the camera decides which GPS data is written to the fitting image.
Also, I recommend installing A-GPS data into your TG-6, then the TG-6 can find the GPS signal when you switch it on. How to do this I described in my article “….”

How to

The TG-6 (by the way the same switch is available on TG Tracker as well) has a switch to activate GPS constantly, even if the camera is switched off. In case you are using older TG cameras, you can activate GPS constantly on the menu. Once you have activated your GPS you only have to have the camera with you.

Select those tracks, which you would like to use, and wipe to the left.
Select more.
Select “share” to send track per mail or to your computer.

As soon as you finished you can download with WiFi the GPS recording with OI.share to your smartphone. OI.share is available for free on Apple App Store or Google Play. From the App, you can send them via mail or store it on your computer (in case you are using Apple devices the easiest way is AirDrop). Or you send it to your OM-D camera to save the position data in the EXIF data of each image.

Use GPS data

GPS data can be saved in different formats. The data of TG-& are .log files, which are not usable for all programs. Therefore in some cases, you have to convert them. For example, in case you would like to save it on Google maps. You can do that on the free website GPS Visualizer.

Select “Convert to GPX” and upload your TG file to the website to convert it. In case you have recorded several files, you have the possibility to select all of them. Those files will be converted into one file. Here one example on Google maps.

Taking a coffee cup at home

Even if you have no studio equipment and have to stay at home, it is possible with simple tools to shoot beautiful images. Windows are perfect light sources and with some creativity, you can even handle to hard light. But first about my image. I had the plan to shoot an espresso cup with fresh, steaming coffee. Here my result.

First I looked for a suitable window that had enough light and set up my image. A wooden board from the kitchen served as background. A piece of fabric as a black background that I found in the closet. In theory, a t-shirt, duvet, or something similar would probably work as well. Since the light through the window was too hard, I had to think of something. Since I had no alternative, I cut up sandwich bags and stuck them to the window with adhesive tape. You can see this quite well in the next picture.

On the other side, you can see a brightener that I still had at home. If you don’t have something like this at home, you can alternatively use a simple piece of white paper. Coffee is made quickly and the cup, like it, is quickly put into the image. But I quickly discovered that the steam after the fresh brewing was not strong enough to be visible in the picture. So a creative solution was needed. First I tried a match, but unfortunately, the smoke was too strong. It looked unnatural. Then my son had the idea to light a coffee bean and let it burn until it glowed. This worked very well. The advantage is that you could put the bean in peace behind the cup and the smoke lasted long enough to take a picture.